The Caveat Of Curiosity

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Curiosity is something that we are all born with – it’s how we learn to walk, talk and define the world around us. Unfortunately, it can be snuffed out at an early age by teachers, caretakers, parents and friends.

The key trait I believe to be the centerpiece of my growth and vast life experience is – curiosity. Underneath this curiosity you will these sub traits: resilience, adventure, learning, and need for belonging. All of these uniting to bring about wisdom.

After all it is curiosity of self-tracking that lead me to where I am today.

The problem is that some of these subtraits can be contradictory and require resolution.

Growing up on a farm in Northeastern Indiana did necessarily support the operating system I was running on. The exposure required just wasn’t there, at least in the capacity I needed. Overtime, this environment became my motivation to look for more.

Meaning that, I wanted to experience as much as possible on this earth while I am here. I’m a firm believer that age is correlated but not a cause of wisdom. Wisdom comes from experiences you gather while writing the chapters of your life.

Life experiences lend to wisdom. Curiosity fuels the journey.

Some people never leave their backyard, while others tour the globe. For me the risk of avoiding the width of what the world had to offer, seemed a waste of my consciousness.

Learning about multiple subjects, cultures, and personalities allows for a deeper connection with others. Ignorance struggles to exist when we are open to new possibilities, ideas, dreams, and beliefs.

Ignorance is to ignore new experiences. However, there is safety in both ignorance and complacency. Many would rather stay where they are with the devil they know rather than, the devil they don’t. Mainly because, choosing a curious life is risky.

The caveat is that a curious life, comes with costs.

I’ve failed tremendously during my journey. Even to the point of losing everything I had gained both financially and physically. Loses like this can cripple everything you love. Without a strong mindset, these types of loses can disable you.

But heres why you need to fail…

Through your failures is how you will grow. For without failure we are unable to learn. This is true since the day we entered into this world. My advice is to avoid people who claim they have never majorly messed up in their life. Don’t invest time or money into them.

Curiosity requires a high level of resilience

Curiosity will take you to places that sit outside of many people’s comfort zones. It’s within these places that we learn the most about life, others and ourselves. However, entering into uncharted territories can lead to major loss and calculating the opportunity cost is hard to quantify.

You need to be willing to experience the best and worst that life has to offer. Without both, you are creating a bias and wisdom doesn’t entertain bias. Going through both creates a strong framework for your critical thinking and decision making. A frame work capable of taking you and others further than ever before.

The worst enemy of curiosity is comfort. The best friend of curiosity is understanding. A necessary by-product of curiosity is mistakes. They serve as a solid metric by which to gauge your growth and learning.

So…

Make mistakes, they are the best teachers you’ll ever have.

About the author

Anthony Close

A relentless visionary, Anthony has led Lab Me from garage-mode to a fine tuned operation. He studied under Clayton Christenson from Harvard Business School. At MIT Anthony studied “AI & Implications in Business”. At Johns Hopkins he completed a course in biostatistics. Anthony is able to code and understand in both Python and AngularJS. Anthony studied Molecular Genetics and Quantitative Chemistry at Purdue University as well as a Doctorate in Chiropractic Medicine from Palmer and extensive post-grade studies in chronic pain management. He enjoys skydiving, red wine, and research on consciousness.

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By Anthony Close

Anthony Close

A relentless visionary, Anthony has led Lab Me from garage-mode to a fine tuned operation. He studied under Clayton Christenson from Harvard Business School. At MIT Anthony studied “AI & Implications in Business”. At Johns Hopkins he completed a course in biostatistics. Anthony is able to code and understand in both Python and AngularJS. Anthony studied Molecular Genetics and Quantitative Chemistry at Purdue University as well as a Doctorate in Chiropractic Medicine from Palmer and extensive post-grade studies in chronic pain management. He enjoys skydiving, red wine, and research on consciousness.